Meteor Scatter calendar 2016

Meteor Scatter Discussion

Meteor Scatter calendar 2016

Postby VK2ZIW » Mon Dec 14, 2015 5:15 am

2015
December 13, 14 - Geminids Meteor Shower.
The Geminids is the king of the meteor showers. It is considered by many to be the best shower in the heavens, producing up to 120 multicolored meteors per hour at its peak. It is produced by debris left behind by an asteroid known as 3200 Phaethon, which was discovered in 1982. The shower runs annually from December 7-17. It peaks this year on the night of the 13th and morning of the 14th. The crescent moon will set early in the evening leaving dark skies for what should be an excellent show. Best viewing will be from a dark location after midnight. Meteors will radiate from the constellation Gemini, but can appear anywhere in the sky.
2016
January 3, 4 - Quadrantids Meteor Shower.
The Quadrantids is an above average shower, with up to 40 meteors per hour at its peak. It is thought to be produced by dust grains left behind by an extinct comet known as 2003 EH1, which was discovered in 2003. The shower runs annually from January 1-5. It peaks this year on the night of the 3rd and morning of the 4th. The second quarter moon will block out all but the brightest meteors this year, but it could still be a good show if you are patient. Best viewing will be from a dark location after midnight. Meteors will radiate from the constellation Bootes, but can appear anywhere in the sky.
April 22, 23 - Lyrids Meteor Shower. The Lyrids is an average shower, usually producing about 20 meteors per hour at its peak. It is produced by dust particles left behind by comet C/1861 G1 Thatcher, which was discovered in 1861. The shower runs annually from April 16-25. It peaks this year on the night of the night of the 22nd and morning of the 23rd. These meteors can sometimes produce bright dust trails that last for several seconds. Unfortunately this year the glare from the full moon will block out all but the brightest meteors. If you are patient, you should still be able to catch a few good ones. Best viewing will be from a dark location after midnight. Meteors will radiate from the constellation Lyra, but can appear anywhere in the sky.
May 6, 7 - Eta Aquarids Meteor Shower. The Eta Aquarids is an above average shower, capable of producing up to 60 meteors per hour at its peak. Most of the activity is seen in the Southern Hemisphere. In the Northern Hemisphere, the rate can reach about 30 meteors per hour. It is produced by dust particles left behind by comet Halley, which has known and observed since ancient times. The shower runs annually from April 19 to May 28. It peaks this year on the night of May 6 and the morning of the May 7. The new moon will ensure dark skies this year for what could be an excellent show. Best viewing will be from a dark location after midnight. Meteors will radiate from the constellation Aquarius, but can appear anywhere in the sky.
July 28, 29 - Delta Aquarids Meteor Shower. The Delta Aquarids is an average shower that can produce up to 20 meteors per hour at its peak. It is produced by debris left behind by comets Marsden and Kracht. The shower runs annually from July 12 to August 23. It peaks this year on the night of July 28 and morning of July 29. The second quarter moon will block most of the fainter meteors this year but if you are patient you should still be able to catch quite a few good ones. Best viewing will be from a dark location after midnight. Meteors will radiate from the constellation Aquarius, but can appear anywhere in the sky.
August 12, 13 - Perseids Meteor Shower. The Perseids is one of the best meteor showers to observe, producing up to 60 meteors per hour at its peak. It is produced by comet Swift-Tuttle, which was discovered in 1862. The Perseids are famous for producing a large number of bright meteors. The shower runs annually from July 17 to August 24. It peaks this year on the night of August 12 and the morning of August 13. The waxing gibbous moon will set shortly after midnight, leaving fairly dark skies for should be an excellent early morning show. Best viewing will be from a dark location after midnight. Meteors will radiate from the constellation Perseus, but can appear anywhere in the sky.
October 7 - Draconids Meteor Shower. The Draconids is a minor meteor shower producing only about 10 meteors per hour. It is produced by dust grains left behind by comet 21P Giacobini-Zinner, which was first discovered in 1900. The Draconids is an unusual shower in that the best viewing is in the early evening instead of early morning like most other showers. The shower runs annually from October 6-10 and peaks this year on the the night of the 7th. The first quarter moon will block the fainter meteors in the early evening. It will set shortly after midnight leaving darker skies for observing any lingering stragglers. Best viewing will be in the early evening from a dark location far away from city lights. Meteors will radiate from the constellation Draco, but can appear anywhere in the sky.
October 21, 22 - Orionids Meteor Shower. The Orionids is an average shower producing up to 20 meteors per hour at its peak. It is produced by dust grains left behind by comet Halley, which has been known and observed since ancient times. The shower runs annually from October 2 to November 7. It peaks this year on the night of October 21 and the morning of October 22. The second quarter moon will block some of the fainter meteors this year, but the Orionids tend to be fairly bright so it could still be a good show. Best viewing will be from a dark location after midnight. Meteors will radiate from the constellation Orion, but can appear anywhere in the sky.
November 4, 5 - Taurids Meteor Shower. The Taurids is a long-running minor meteor shower producing only about 5-10 meteors per hour. It is unusual in that it consists of two separate streams. The first is produced by dust grains left behind by Asteroid 2004 TG10. The second stream is produced by debris left behind by Comet 2P Encke. The shower runs annually from September 7 to December 10. It peaks this year on the the night of November 4. The first quarter moon will set just after midnight leaving dark skies for viewing. Best viewing will be just after midnight from a dark location far away from city lights. Meteors will radiate from the constellation Taurus, but can appear anywhere in the sky.
November 17, 18 - Leonids Meteor Shower. The Leonids is an average shower, producing up to 15 meteors per hour at its peak. This shower is unique in that it has a cyclonic peak about every 33 years where hundreds of meteors per hour can be seen. That last of these occurred in 2001. The Leonids is produced by dust grains left behind by comet Tempel-Tuttle, which was discovered in 1865. The shower runs annually from November 6-30. It peaks this year on the night of the 17th and morning of the 18th. The waning gibbous moon will block many of the fainter meteors this year, but if you are patient you should be able to catch quite a few good ones. Best viewing will be from a dark location after midnight. Meteors will radiate from the constellation Leo, but can appear anywhere in the sky.
December 13, 14 - Geminids Meteor Shower. The Geminids is the king of the meteor showers. It is considered by many to be the best shower in the heavens, producing up to 120 multicolored meteors per hour at its peak. It is produced by debris left behind by an asteroid known as 3200 Phaethon, which was discovered in 1982. The shower runs annually from December 7-17. It peaks this year on the night of the 13th and morning of the 14th. The nearly full moon will block out many of the fainter meteors this year, but the Geminids are so bright and numerous that it could still be a good show. Best viewing will be from a dark location after midnight. Meteors will radiate from the constellation Gemini, but can appear anywhere in the sky.
Source: http://www.seasky.org/astronomy/astronomy-calendar-2016.html
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Re: Meteor Scatter calendar 2016

Postby VK2ZIW » Mon Dec 21, 2015 8:24 pm

2015 December 13, 14 - Geminids Meteor Shower - Very poor

Can anybody explain this?
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Re: Meteor Scatter calendar 2016

Postby ZL4DK » Tue Dec 22, 2015 9:40 am

This calendar is biased towards the northern Hemisphere like a lot of this stuff. The best southern Hemisphere meteor shower I am lead to believe is the Eta Aquarids.
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Re: Meteor Scatter calendar 2016

Postby VK2ZIW » Sat Dec 26, 2015 4:05 pm

Keep your eye on Andrew's observations:


http://www.rmob.org/livedata/main.php#Andrew%20Klekociuk
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Re: Meteor Scatter calendar 2016

Postby VK2ZRH » Sat Dec 26, 2015 4:45 pm

VK2ZIW said:
2015 December 13, 14 - Geminids Meteor Shower - Very poor

Can anybody explain this?

See "Everything you need to know: Geminid meteor shower", at: http://earthsky.org/space/everything-yo ... ower#watch
This shower favors Earth’s Northern Hemisphere, but it’s visible from the Southern Hemisphere, too.

There you are ! 8)

Back in the 1970s, I recall ping jockeys making such complaints as you made. :shock:

Posted in the interests of enlightment.
73, Roger Harrison VK2ZRH
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Re: Meteor Scatter calendar 2016

Postby VK3ZYC » Sat Dec 26, 2015 5:15 pm

big pings jpg.JPG
a Screen capture up to 5 or 6 pings per 30 sec with some big burns

VK2ZIW said:

2015 December 13, 14 - Geminids Meteor Shower - Very poor

Can anybody explain this?


I don't think it was poor just got the dates wrong.

Saturday morning 19th Dec. was pretty good on 144.230 FSK441 Session.

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Re: Meteor Scatter calendar 2016

Postby VK2ZIW » Sat Dec 26, 2015 5:20 pm

Thanks Roger VK2ZRH,

See "Everything you need to know: Geminid meteor shower", at: http://earthsky.org/space/everything-yo ... ower#watch


In the picture of Phaethon, there is no mention of the, other side where the meteors impinge on the
Southern Hemisphere. I assume, the meteors do a symmetrical ellipse around the sun and should
intercept Earth's orbit in two places (as it does in the picture).

Roger, those links to discussion papers, dead links, do you have copies?

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Re: Meteor Scatter calendar 2016

Postby VK2ZRH » Sun Dec 27, 2015 8:30 am

Hi Alan,

The Geminids' orbit only intersects the Earth's orbit once a year, IIRC. The diagram of the orbital ellipse in the EarthSky article may be confusing. A transect of the orbit from the December conjunction with Earth is less than the distance across Earth's orbit, if you follow me.
73, Roger Harrison VK2ZRH
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Re: Meteor Scatter calendar 2016

Postby VK2ZIW » Wed Jan 06, 2016 5:45 am

2016
January 3, 4 - Quadrantids Meteor Shower.

As you can see from Andrew K's data, nothing useful in our Southern Hemisphere.


Klekociuk_012016rmob.TXT’ saved [4540/4540]

jan| 00h| 01h| 02h| 03h| 04h| 05h| 06h| 07h| 08h| 09h| 10h| 11h| 12h| 13h| 14h| 15h| 16h| 17h| 18h| 19h| 20h| 21h| 22h| 23h|
01| 5 | 4 | 3 | 8 | 6 | 5 | 10| 8 | 8 | 11| 28| 24| 15| 19| 20| 24| 30| 24| 13| 18| 32| 11| 9 | 12|
02| 19| 4 | 23| 12| 15| 16| 14| 12| 14|??? |??? |??? |??? |??? |??? |??? |??? |??? |??? |??? |??? |??? |??? |??? |
03| 1 | 2 | 10| 2 | 3 | 3 | 7 | 9 | 6 | 5 | 8 | 2 | 6 | 5 | 10| 12| 19| 9 | 5 | 0 |??? |??? |??? |??? |
04|??? |??? |??? | 2 | 3 | 0 | 3 | 2 | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0 |
05| 0 | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0 |<no data yet>

|???| == no data collected, lost.
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Re: Meteor Scatter calendar 2016

Postby VK2ZIW » Wed Jan 06, 2016 5:56 am

The Czech Republic data shows a peak, we missed.


NACHODSKO-R3_012016rmob.TXT
jan| 00h| 01h| 02h| 03h| 04h| 05h| 06h| 07h| 08h| 09h| 10h| 11h| 12h| 13h| 14h| 15h| 16h| 17h| 18h| 19h| 20h| 21h| 22h| 23h|
01|006 |004 |006 |011 |007 |011 |012 |013 |010 |010 |010 |007 |018 |010 |005 |008 |006 |002 |007 |011 |006 |005 |004 |007 |
02|009 |007 |007 |007 |006 |013 |012 |008 |003 |014 |009 |010 |011 |016 |014 |010 |007 |004 |006 |010 |008 |006 |013 |005 |
03|012 |009 |015 |014 |017 |021 |015 |007 |005 |010 |014 |024 |026 |023 |020 |019 |010 |005 |009 |004 |009 |014 |011 |036 |
04|042 |044 |062 |091 |098 |099 |072 |027 |056 |085 |102 |096 |091 |053 |044 |020 |016 |008 |007 |003 |002 |005 |009 |010 |
05|008 |013 |014 |018 |017 |008 |014 |010 |009 |006 |010 |018 |012 |005 |006 |011 |002 |006 |004 |003 |??? |??? |??? |??? |
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Re: Meteor Scatter calendar 2016

Postby VK2ZIW » Tue Jan 12, 2016 6:39 am

No sleep for MS, midnight is the time:

jan| 00h| 01h| 02h| 03h| 04h| 05h| 06h| 07h| 08h| 09h| 10h| 11h| 12h| 13h| 14h| 15h| 16h| 17h| 18h| 19h| 20h| 21h| 22h| 23h|

08| 4 | 4 | 2 | 4 | 1 | 2 | 2 | 2 | 7 | 4 |??? | 8 | 11| 6 | 11| 9 | 10| 15| 11| 21| 20| 2 |??? |??? |
09|??? |??? |??? |??? |??? |??? |??? |??? | 8 | 19| 18| 27| 60| 63| 44| 60| 67| 66| 53| 58| 67| 28|??? |??? |
10|??? |??? |??? | 1 | 1 | 2 | 4 | 20| 12| 24| 22| 55| 37| 39| 48| 56| 51| 50| 72| 46| 37| 13| 12| 8 |
11| 9 | 4 | 2 | 2 | 14| 14| 13| 27| 47| 34| 90| 175| 158| 151| 152| 166| 85| 65| 54| 25|??? |??? |??? |??? |

Alan VK2ZIW
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Re: Meteor Scatter calendar 2016

Postby VK2ZIW » Thu Jan 21, 2016 6:12 pm

[color=#0040FF]Andrew K's data is nolonger available. [/color]
He was the ONLY Southern Hemisphere data collector.
Last data:
jan| 00h| 01h| 02h| 03h| 04h| 05h| 06h| 07h| 08h| 09h| 10h| 11h| 12h| 13h| 14h| 15h| 16h| 17h| 18h| 19h| 20h| 21h| 22h| 23h|
01| 5 | 4 | 3 | 8 | 6 | 5 | 10| 8 | 8 | 11| 28| 24| 15| 19| 20| 24| 30| 24| 13| 18| 32| 11| 9 | 12|
02| 19| 4 | 23| 12| 15| 16| 14| 12| 14|??? |??? |??? |??? |??? |??? |??? |??? |??? |??? |??? |??? |??? |??? |??? |
03| 1 | 2 | 10| 2 | 3 | 3 | 7 | 9 | 6 | 5 | 8 | 2 | 6 | 5 | 10| 12| 19| 9 | 5 | 0 |??? |??? |??? |??? |
04|??? |??? |??? | 2 | 3 | 0 | 3 | 2 | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0 |
05| 0 | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0 |
06| 0 | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0 |
07| 0 | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0 | 15| 7 | 3 | 2 |
08| 4 | 4 | 2 | 4 | 1 | 2 | 2 | 2 | 7 | 4 |??? | 8 | 11| 6 | 11| 9 | 10| 15| 11| 21| 20| 2 |??? |??? |
09|??? |??? |??? |??? |??? |??? |??? |??? | 8 | 19| 18| 27| 60| 63| 44| 60| 67| 66| 53| 58| 67| 28|??? |??? |
10|??? |??? |??? | 1 | 1 | 2 | 4 | 20| 12| 24| 22| 55| 37| 39| 48| 56| 51| 50| 72| 46| 37| 13| 12| 8 |
11| 9 | 4 | 2 | 2 | 14| 14| 13| 27| 47| 34| 90| 175| 158| 151| 152| 166| 85| 65| 54| 25| 31| 23| 34| 28|
12| 24| 49| 35| 12| 12| 26| 18| 37| 43| 60| 77| 78| 51| 56| 8 | 0 | 0 | 0 | 65| 32| 25| 11| 3 | 1 |
13| 5 | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0 | 0 | 1 | 0 | 0 | 1 | 0 | 0 | 2 | 2 | 3 | 2 | 11| 14| 24| 25| 18| 19| 24| 43|
14| 32| 22| 26| 55| 42| 41| 52| 103| 357| 349| 361| 441| 384| 507| 596| 674| 622| 626| 570| 581| 454| 262| 162| 107|
15| 74| 47| 36| 35| 18| 39| 38| 62| 104| 139| 160| 180| 197| 237| 223| 219| 206| 174| 197| 188| 172| 87| 62| 40|
16| 41| 40| 45|??? |??? |??? |??? |??? |??? |??? |??? |??? |??? |??? |??? |??? |??? |??? |??? |??? |??? |??? |??? |??? |
17|??? |??? |??? |??? |??? |??? |??? |??? |??? |??? |??? |??? |??? |??? |??? |??? |??? |??? |??? |??? |??? |??? |??? |??? |

Note: The Jan 14 shower is not 'seen' in the Northern Hemisphere..
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Re: Meteor Scatter calendar 2016

Postby VK2ZIW » Fri Jan 22, 2016 8:02 pm

Wayne VK2XN has started gathering data, but not visible today (now).
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Re: Meteor Scatter calendar 2016

Postby VK4UH » Sat Apr 23, 2016 11:39 pm

This morning was predicted to be the peak of the Leonid meteor shower. Although there were at least 16 stations operating on 144.230 FSK441 during the normal Saturday morning activity session, I didn't think conditions were much above any random day.

However at around 22:00 UTC, 2hours after dawn here in VK4 I recorded this image of the longest ping have ever seen on 2m!

This super-burn came from VK3II in QF21RN. The lower panel of course came first and ran the entire duration of a 30 second sweep, showing the characteristic pulsating pattern of a hyper-dense reflection,
Amazingly the same burn was still continuing 30 seconds later during my next receive period and ran through that as well! as in the upper panel.

Jim 3II reported that he received my signal at a constant S9 throughout my transmit period ( between the upper and lower panel above), and was unable to decode the signal as is common in FSK441 on constant loud signals.

We both initially thought someone local was transmitting in the wrong period!

Clearly the burn was not finished even at the end of the third consecutive period.

Thank you Leo!
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